California’s Bounty Blooms in John Steinbeck’s Salinas Valley

The National Steinbeck Center in downtown Salinas uses John Steinbeck’s books to tell the Salinas Valley story

We live in a disconnected age where colors define politics and words like “rural” and “urban” are used to describe who we are. For children of big city parents the estrangement can be particularly acute. Just ask a 10-year old where food comes from. Chances are he’ll look perplexed, then slowly recover with a smile and yell, ‘the grocery store.” If this has happened to you perhaps it’s time to bypass the summer cruise or theme park visit and make this year’s vacation a learning experience. I have the perfect place: California’s Salinas Valley, a region rich in soil and history where MBA farmers grow food in an area made famous by Nobel and Pulitzer prize winning author John Steinbeck.

Steinbeck was in his mid 20s when he began writing about the people of small town and rural California. Set in nearby Monterey, Tortilla Flat (1935) and Cannery Row (1945) focused on eccentrics who scramble to make a living during hard times. Be sure your child reads at least a synopsis of the latter before visiting the Monterey Bay Aquarium located on Cannery Row. Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath (1939) conveys the pain of the Great Depression’s Dust Bowl migration as no history book can and explains the ancestral ties still linking Southern California to the American Midwest. But Steinbeck always considered his greatest book to be East of Eden (1952) since it is both a profile and paean to his hometown of Salinas and the struggles of its farmers to get perishable crops to distant markets. More

 

Montreal is 375-Years Old and is Hosting a Year Long Birthday Party

Montreal founder Paul Chomedey de Maisonneuve stands at the center of the city’s Place d’Armes

Montreal is celebrating its 375th birthday this year. The French-Canadian city on the St Lawrence River has long been known for its festivals, including the dramatic, mostly outdoor Festival of Lights in freezing February. But this year will be special. There will be street theatre performed by international groups, a convergence of three major orchestras, museum exhibits and sound and light shows throughout the year. One is called “Leonard Cohen, A crack in Everything, at the Musee d’art contemporain de Montreal.

The late poet/songwriter could only have come from Montreal. For here, in the world’s second-largest French speaking city, Cohen was exposed to both lyrical French songs and American country music. He grew up in a city that even in the 1950’s offered the European cafe experience, and a certain poetic melancholy. More

 

Detroit emerges from Bankruptcy, but recovery will take years

Detroit’s young workforce gathers at Campus Martius Square at the end of the day to network before returning home to downtown lofts

In the year since Detroit emerged from a 16-month Chap. 9 bankruptcy, the mood of the city has shifted from stoic despair to guarded optimism. Weekly openings of new restaurants, galleries and designer shops are creating a buzz that’s impossible to deny. The streetlights are back on along Woodward Avenue, where track is being laid for a light rail commuter train 90% financed by private investors. Ambulances and police cars now respond when summoned. Midtown Detroit recently acquired the sine qua non of gentility: a Whole Foods market.  More

 

Buyers Beware
Buzz Phrases & Fake Photos
Mar Internet Hotel Advertising

Pictures don’t always say a thousand words. Have you ever booked a hotel that looks great online, only to show up and find out you were completely misled? There are all kinds of phony marketing tactics designed to get you to click. When looking online for a hotel, it’s common to see photos of spacious rooms and intimate pools. In fact, hotels are known for “photo fake outs.” These are photos that show a hotel room looking more spacious than it really is, or they make a crowded beach at a mega resort look like a deserted oasis. More

France’s Luberon
Learning to Love the Luberon

The Luberon area of Provence is known for its hilltop towns, lavender fields and its colorful bounty–purple aubergine, scarlet tomatoes, and the orange-fleshed Cavaillon melon that is famous all over France. More